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Husker walk-on Krull could have bright future at punter

North Platte walk-on Bryson Krull has never been coached on how to punt, but the position could end up being his new calling at Nebraska.
North Platte walk-on Bryson Krull has never been coached on how to punt, but the position could end up being his new calling at Nebraska. (Nate Clouse)

Bellevue West head coach Michael Huffman was on the field for his first practice leading the North team for the 2018 Shrine Bowl of Nebraska when he heard a sound that made him stop in his tracks.

There was North Platte’s Bryson Krull, who committed to Nebraska as a walk-on tight end, booming punt after punt through the air unlike any high school player Huffman had ever seen.

Seeing how that list includes former NU All-Big 12 punter Alex Henery, Huffman’s reaction certainly carried some weight.

“I was blessed to be on the staff with Alex Henery at (Omaha) Burke when he was there,” Huffman said. “The ball did not come off his foot like it comes off Bryson Krull’s foot. He almost explodes the ball, and I’m worried because those things are like 79 bucks a piece.

“I hope (Nebraska’s coaches) already know that, but (NU linebackers coach) Barrett Ruud will be getting a text as soon as we’re done with camp to make sure.”

At 6-5, 220, Krull hopes to work his way into the Huskers’ tight end/H-back rotation, but he’s also very intrigued about the possibility of trying his hand at punter.

Huffman said he saw Krull boot the ball at least 55 yards in the air during a recent practice. Krull noted this has been an “off-week” for him, and normally his kicks go as far as 60-65 yards before hitting the ground.

What’s remarkable is that Krull has developed his punting ability essentially all on his own, teaching himself by watching YouTube videos and simply going out and kicking the football.

“I punted for all four years in high school, but as far as technique and coaching, I haven’t had much,” Krull said. “Everything I know about punting I’ve either taught myself or watched videos, stuff like that. I’ve never had someone teach me how to punt.”

That could change very soon, though, as Krull said he plans to meet with Nebraska’s coaches once he arrives on campus to discuss possibly trying out at punter.

“I love punting,” Krull said. “It’s a weird thing to say, but punting is fun. A good punt can change the game. If you can flip the field, it’s a really good feeling to just have a bomb. The door is for sure open. I’m actually going to ask the coaches and see what they think.”

There was another player who traveled a very similar path as Krull just six years ago, as a wide receiver from Grand Island raised plenty of eyebrows with his exceptional punting at the Shrine Bowl only to later become the Big Ten Punter of the Year for the Huskers.

That player was the late Sam Foltz.

“It’s really cool to know I’m kind of in the same situation he was,” Krull said. “It’s inspiring to know that someone like him has done it before, and you can see the possibilities that are out there.”